Host-diet-gut microbiome interactions influence human energy balance: a randomized clinical trial (bibtex)
by Karen D. Corbin, Elvis A. Carnero, Blake Dirks, Daria Igudesman, Fanchao Yi, Andrew Marcus, Taylor L. Davis, Richard E. Pratley, Bruce E. Rittmann, Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown and Steven R. Smith
Abstract:
Abstract The gut microbiome is emerging as a key modulator of human energy balance. Prior studies in humans lacked the environmental and dietary controls and precision required to quantitatively evaluate the contributions of the gut microbiome. Using a Microbiome Enhancer Diet (MBD) designed to deliver more dietary substrates to the colon and therefore modulate the gut microbiome, we quantified microbial and host contributions to human energy balance in a controlled feeding study with a randomized crossover design in young, healthy, weight stable males and females (NCT02939703). In a metabolic ward where the environment was strictly controlled, we measured energy intake, energy expenditure, and energy output (fecal and urinary). The primary endpoint was the within-participant difference in host metabolizable energy between experimental conditions [Control, Western Diet (WD) vs. MBD]. The secondary endpoints were enteroendocrine hormones, hunger/satiety, and food intake. Here we show that, compared to the WD, the MBD leads to an additional 116 $\pm$ 56 kcals (P < 0.0001) lost in feces daily and thus, lower metabolizable energy for the host (89.5 $\pm$ 0.73%; range 84.2-96.1% on the MBD vs. 95.4 $\pm$ 0.21%; range 94.1-97.0% on the WD; P < 0.0001) without changes in energy expenditure, hunger/satiety or food intake (P > 0.05). Microbial 16S rRNA gene copy number (a surrogate of biomass) increases (P < 0.0001), beta-diversity changes (whole genome shotgun sequencing; P = 0.02), and fermentation products increase (P < 0.01) on an MBD as compared to a WD along with significant changes in the host enteroendocrine system (P < 0.0001). The substantial interindividual variability in metabolizable energy on the MBD is explained in part by fecal SCFAs and biomass. Our results reveal the complex host-diet-microbiome interplay that modulates energy balance.
Reference:
Host-diet-gut microbiome interactions influence human energy balance: a randomized clinical trial (Karen D. Corbin, Elvis A. Carnero, Blake Dirks, Daria Igudesman, Fanchao Yi, Andrew Marcus, Taylor L. Davis, Richard E. Pratley, Bruce E. Rittmann, Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown and Steven R. Smith), In Nature Communications, volume 14, 2023.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{Corbin:2023aa,
	abstract = {Abstract The gut microbiome is emerging as a key modulator of human energy balance. Prior studies in humans lacked the environmental and dietary controls and precision required to quantitatively evaluate the contributions of the gut microbiome. Using a Microbiome Enhancer Diet (MBD) designed to deliver more dietary substrates to the colon and therefore modulate the gut microbiome, we quantified microbial and host contributions to human energy balance in a controlled feeding study with a randomized crossover design in young, healthy, weight stable males and females (NCT02939703). In a metabolic ward where the environment was strictly controlled, we measured energy intake, energy expenditure, and energy output (fecal and urinary). The primary endpoint was the within-participant difference in host metabolizable energy between experimental conditions [Control, Western Diet (WD) vs. MBD]. The secondary endpoints were enteroendocrine hormones, hunger/satiety, and food intake. Here we show that, compared to the WD, the MBD leads to an additional 116 $\pm$ 56 kcals (P < 0.0001) lost in feces daily and thus, lower metabolizable energy for the host (89.5 $\pm$ 0.73%; range 84.2-96.1% on the MBD vs. 95.4 $\pm$ 0.21%; range 94.1-97.0% on the WD; P < 0.0001) without changes in energy expenditure, hunger/satiety or food intake (P > 0.05). Microbial 16S rRNA gene copy number (a surrogate of biomass) increases (P < 0.0001), beta-diversity changes (whole genome shotgun sequencing; P = 0.02), and fermentation products increase (P < 0.01) on an MBD as compared to a WD along with significant changes in the host enteroendocrine system (P < 0.0001). The substantial interindividual variability in metabolizable energy on the MBD is explained in part by fecal SCFAs and biomass. Our results reveal the complex host-diet-microbiome interplay that modulates energy balance.},
	author = {Corbin, Karen D. and Carnero, Elvis A. and Dirks, Blake and Igudesman, Daria and Yi, Fanchao and Marcus, Andrew and Davis, Taylor L. and Pratley, Richard E. and Rittmann, Bruce E. and Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa and Smith, Steven R.},
	date = {2023/05/31/},
	date-added = {2023-07-14 20:10:59 +0100},
	date-modified = {2023-07-14 20:10:59 +0100},
	doi = {10.1038/s41467-023-38778-x},
	dp = {DOI.org (Crossref)},
	isbn = {2041-1723},
	j2 = {Nat Commun},
	journal = {Nature Communications},
	keywords = {Plant-Based Diet},
	la = {en},
	month = {2023/06/15/08:45:49},
	number = {1},
	pages = {3161},
	st = {Host-diet-gut microbiome interactions influence human energy balance},
	title = {Host-diet-gut microbiome interactions influence human energy balance: a randomized clinical trial},
	url = {https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-023-38778-x},
	volume = {14},
	year = {2023},
	bdsk-url-1 = {https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-023-38778-x},
	bdsk-url-2 = {https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-023-38778-x}}
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