Associations of diet with albuminuria and kidney function decline. (bibtex)
by Julie Lin, Frank B Hu and Gary C Curhan
Abstract:
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Sparse longitudinal data exist on how diet influences microalbuminuria and estimated GFR (eGFR) decline in people with well-preserved kidney function. DESIGN, SETTINGS, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Of the 3348 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study who had data on urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in 2000, 3296 also had data on eGFR change between 1989 and 2000. Cumulative average intake of nutrients over 14 years was derived from semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires answered in 1984, 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998. Microalbuminuria presence and eGFR decline > or = 30% were the outcomes of interest. RESULTS: Compared with the lowest quartile, the highest quartile of animal fat (odds ratio (OR): 1.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12 to 2.64) and two or more servings of red meat per week (OR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.01 to 2.26) were directly associated with microalbuminuria. After adjustment for other nutrients individually associated with eGFR decline > or = 30%, only the highest quartile of sodium intake remained directly associated (OR: 1.52; 95% CI: 1.10 to 2.09), whereas beta-carotene appeared protective (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.43 to 0.89). Results did not vary by diabetes status for microalbuminuria and eGFR outcomes or in those without hypertension at baseline for eGFR decline. No significant associations were seen for other types of protein, fat, vitamins, folate, fructose, or potassium. CONCLUSIONS: Higher dietary intake of animal fat and two or more servings per week of red meat may increase risk for microalbuminuria. Lower sodium and higher beta-carotene intake may reduce risk for eGFR decline.
Reference:
Associations of diet with albuminuria and kidney function decline. (Julie Lin, Frank B Hu and Gary C Curhan), In Clin J Am Soc Nephrol, volume 5, 2010.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{Lin:2010aa,
	abstract = {BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Sparse longitudinal data exist on how diet influences microalbuminuria and estimated GFR (eGFR) decline in people with well-preserved kidney function. DESIGN, SETTINGS, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Of the 3348 women participating in the Nurses' Health Study who had data on urinary albumin to creatinine ratio in 2000, 3296 also had data on eGFR change between 1989 and 2000. Cumulative average intake of nutrients over 14 years was derived from semiquantitative food frequency questionnaires answered in 1984, 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998. Microalbuminuria presence and eGFR decline > or = 30% were the outcomes of interest. RESULTS: Compared with the lowest quartile, the highest quartile of animal fat (odds ratio (OR): 1.72; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.12 to 2.64) and two or more servings of red meat per week (OR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.01 to 2.26) were directly associated with microalbuminuria. After adjustment for other nutrients individually associated with eGFR decline > or = 30%, only the highest quartile of sodium intake remained directly associated (OR: 1.52; 95% CI: 1.10 to 2.09), whereas beta-carotene appeared protective (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.43 to 0.89). Results did not vary by diabetes status for microalbuminuria and eGFR outcomes or in those without hypertension at baseline for eGFR decline. No significant associations were seen for other types of protein, fat, vitamins, folate, fructose, or potassium. CONCLUSIONS: Higher dietary intake of animal fat and two or more servings per week of red meat may increase risk for microalbuminuria. Lower sodium and higher beta-carotene intake may reduce risk for eGFR decline.},
	address = {Renal Division, Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 75 Francis Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. jlin11@partners.org},
	author = {Lin, Julie and Hu, Frank B and Curhan, Gary C},
	crdt = {2010/03/20 06:00},
	date = {2010 May},
	date-added = {2023-05-24 17:48:54 +0100},
	date-modified = {2023-05-24 18:08:22 +0100},
	dcom = {20100812},
	dep = {20100318},
	doi = {10.2215/CJN.08001109},
	edat = {2010/03/20 06:00},
	gr = {K08 DK066246/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States; P01CA055075/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States; P01 CA055075/CA/NCI NIH HHS/United States; R01HL065582/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States; R01 HL065582/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/United States; R03 DK078551/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States; R01DK066574/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States; R01 DK066574/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/United States},
	issn = {1555-905X (Electronic); 1555-9041 (Print); 1555-9041 (Linking)},
	jid = {101271570},
	journal = {Clin J Am Soc Nephrol},
	jt = {Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN},
	keywords = {Diet},
	language = {eng},
	lid = {10.2215/CJN.08001109 {$[$}doi{$]$}},
	lr = {20220331},
	mh = {Adult; Albuminuria/*etiology/physiopathology/*prevention \& control; Chi-Square Distribution; Diet/*adverse effects; Diet, Sodium-Restricted; Dietary Fats/adverse effects; Dietary Proteins/adverse effects; Disease Progression; *Feeding Behavior; Female; *Glomerular Filtration Rate; Health Surveys; Humans; Kidney/*physiopathology; Logistic Models; Meat/adverse effects; Middle Aged; Nurses; Odds Ratio; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors; Sodium Chloride, Dietary/adverse effects; Surveys and Questionnaires; Time Factors; beta Carotene/administration \& dosage},
	mhda = {2010/08/13 06:00},
	month = {May},
	number = {5},
	own = {NLM},
	pages = {836--843},
	phst = {2010/03/20 06:00 {$[$}entrez{$]$}; 2010/03/20 06:00 {$[$}pubmed{$]$}; 2010/08/13 06:00 {$[$}medline{$]$}},
	pii = {CJN.08001109; 08001109},
	pl = {United States},
	pmc = {PMC2863979},
	pmid = {20299364},
	pst = {ppublish},
	pt = {Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural},
	rn = {0 (Dietary Fats); 0 (Dietary Proteins); 0 (Sodium Chloride, Dietary); 01YAE03M7J (beta Carotene)},
	sb = {IM},
	status = {MEDLINE},
	title = {Associations of diet with albuminuria and kidney function decline.},
	url = {https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2863979/?report=printable},
	volume = {5},
	year = {2010},
	bdsk-url-1 = {https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.08001109}}
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