Plant-Based Diets and Hypertension (bibtex)
by Shivam Joshi, Leigh Ettinger and Scott E. Liebman
Abstract:
Hypertension is a global epidemic and a risk factor for many adverse outcomes, including cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and death. Lifestyle plays a significant role in the development and maintenance of hypertension, and guidelines from several organizations recommend lifestyle modifications as first-line intervention for hypertensive patients. Data supporting the use of plant-based diets in the treatment of hypertension goes back almost a century. More recently, clinical trial data, including randomized controlled trials, have established plant-based diets as an effective lifestyle intervention for high blood pressure (BP). Plant-based diets differ from the standard American diet in a myriad of ways, with some substances being present in either substantially higher or lower amounts. Although the precise mechanism of a plant-based diet's beneficial effects on BP is unknown, many of these differences may be responsible. Attributes of a plant-based diet that may lower BP include a lower energy content leading to weight loss, a lower sodium content, an increased potassium content, reduced oxidative stress, higher bioavailability of the vasodilator nitric oxide, and beneficial effects on the microbiome. The evidenced-based benefits of plant-based diets in treating hypertension should lead providers to advocate for this dietary pattern for their patients.
Reference:
Plant-Based Diets and Hypertension (Shivam Joshi, Leigh Ettinger and Scott E. Liebman), In American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, volume 14, 2020.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{doi:10.1177/1559827619875411,
	abstract = { Hypertension is a global epidemic and a risk factor for many adverse outcomes, including cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and death. Lifestyle plays a significant role in the development and maintenance of hypertension, and guidelines from several organizations recommend lifestyle modifications as first-line intervention for hypertensive patients. Data supporting the use of plant-based diets in the treatment of hypertension goes back almost a century. More recently, clinical trial data, including randomized controlled trials, have established plant-based diets as an effective lifestyle intervention for high blood pressure (BP). Plant-based diets differ from the standard American diet in a myriad of ways, with some substances being present in either substantially higher or lower amounts. Although the precise mechanism of a plant-based diet's beneficial effects on BP is unknown, many of these differences may be responsible. Attributes of a plant-based diet that may lower BP include a lower energy content leading to weight loss, a lower sodium content, an increased potassium content, reduced oxidative stress, higher bioavailability of the vasodilator nitric oxide, and beneficial effects on the microbiome. The evidenced-based benefits of plant-based diets in treating hypertension should lead providers to advocate for this dietary pattern for their patients. },
	author = {Shivam Joshi and Leigh Ettinger and Scott E. Liebman},
	date-added = {2023-01-08 14:21:41 +0000},
	date-modified = {2023-01-08 14:21:56 +0000},
	doi = {10.1177/1559827619875411},
	eprint = {https://doi.org/10.1177/1559827619875411},
	journal = {American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine},
	keywords = {Hypertension, Plant-Based Diet},
	number = {4},
	pages = {397-405},
	title = {Plant-Based Diets and Hypertension},
	url = {https://doi.org/10.1177/1559827619875411},
	volume = {14},
	year = {2020},
	bdsk-url-1 = {https://doi.org/10.1177/1559827619875411}}
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