Patient-Reported Outcomes from a Pilot Plant-Based Lifestyle Medicine Program in a Safety-Net Setting (bibtex)
by Rachel E. Massar, Michelle McMacken, Lorraine Kwok, Shivam Joshi, Sapana Shah, Rebecca Boas, Robin Ortiz, Lilian Correa, Krisann Polito-Moller and Stephanie L. Albert
Abstract:
Lifestyle medicine interventions that emphasize healthy behavior changes are growing in popularity in U.S. health systems. Safety-net healthcare settings that serve low-income and uninsured populations most at risk for lifestyle-related disease are ideal venues for lifestyle medicine interventions. Patient-reported outcomes are important indicators of the efficacy of lifestyle medicine interventions. Past research on patient-reported outcomes of lifestyle medicine interventions has occurred outside of traditional healthcare care settings. In this study, we aimed to assess patient-reported outcomes on nutrition knowledge, barriers to adopting a plant-based diet, food and beverage consumption, lifestyle behaviors, self-rated health, and quality-of-life of participants in a pilot plant-based lifestyle medicine program in an urban safety-net healthcare system. We surveyed participants at three time points (baseline, 3 months, 6 months) to measure change over time. After 6 months of participation in the program, nutrition knowledge increased by 7.2 percentage points, participants reported an average of 2.4 fewer barriers to adopting a plant-based diet, the score on a modified healthful plant-based diet index increased by 5.3 points, physical activity increased by 0.7 days per week while hours of media consumption declined by 0.7 h per day, and the percentage of participants who reported that their quality of sleep was “good” or “very good” increased by 12.2 percentage points. Our findings demonstrate that a lifestyle medicine intervention in a safety-net healthcare setting can achieve significant improvements in patient-reported outcomes. Key lessons for other lifestyle medicine interventions include using a multidisciplinary team; addressing all pillars of lifestyle medicine; and the ability for patients to improve knowledge, barriers, skills, and behaviors with adequate support.
Reference:
Patient-Reported Outcomes from a Pilot Plant-Based Lifestyle Medicine Program in a Safety-Net Setting (Rachel E. Massar, Michelle McMacken, Lorraine Kwok, Shivam Joshi, Sapana Shah, Rebecca Boas, Robin Ortiz, Lilian Correa, Krisann Polito-Moller and Stephanie L. Albert), In Nutrients, volume 15, 2023.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{nu15132857,
	abstract = {Lifestyle medicine interventions that emphasize healthy behavior changes are growing in popularity in U.S. health systems. Safety-net healthcare settings that serve low-income and uninsured populations most at risk for lifestyle-related disease are ideal venues for lifestyle medicine interventions. Patient-reported outcomes are important indicators of the efficacy of lifestyle medicine interventions. Past research on patient-reported outcomes of lifestyle medicine interventions has occurred outside of traditional healthcare care settings. In this study, we aimed to assess patient-reported outcomes on nutrition knowledge, barriers to adopting a plant-based diet, food and beverage consumption, lifestyle behaviors, self-rated health, and quality-of-life of participants in a pilot plant-based lifestyle medicine program in an urban safety-net healthcare system. We surveyed participants at three time points (baseline, 3 months, 6 months) to measure change over time. After 6 months of participation in the program, nutrition knowledge increased by 7.2 percentage points, participants reported an average of 2.4 fewer barriers to adopting a plant-based diet, the score on a modified healthful plant-based diet index increased by 5.3 points, physical activity increased by 0.7 days per week while hours of media consumption declined by 0.7 h per day, and the percentage of participants who reported that their quality of sleep was “good” or “very good” increased by 12.2 percentage points. Our findings demonstrate that a lifestyle medicine intervention in a safety-net healthcare setting can achieve significant improvements in patient-reported outcomes. Key lessons for other lifestyle medicine interventions include using a multidisciplinary team; addressing all pillars of lifestyle medicine; and the ability for patients to improve knowledge, barriers, skills, and behaviors with adequate support.},
	article-number = {2857},
	author = {Massar, Rachel E. and McMacken, Michelle and Kwok, Lorraine and Joshi, Shivam and Shah, Sapana and Boas, Rebecca and Ortiz, Robin and Correa, Lilian and Polito-Moller, Krisann and Albert, Stephanie L.},
	date-added = {2023-06-27 21:47:53 +0100},
	date-modified = {2023-06-27 21:47:53 +0100},
	doi = {10.3390/nu15132857},
	issn = {2072-6643},
	journal = {Nutrients},
	keywords = {Plant-Based Diet},
	number = {13},
	title = {Patient-Reported Outcomes from a Pilot Plant-Based Lifestyle Medicine Program in a Safety-Net Setting},
	url = {https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/15/13/2857},
	volume = {15},
	year = {2023},
	bdsk-url-1 = {https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/15/13/2857},
	bdsk-url-2 = {https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15132857}}
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